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Author Archives: Jesica Jayd Lewis

About Jesica Jayd Lewis

Jayd is a graduate student in the Ancient History program at North Carolina State University. She is primarily interested in Aegean History and Archaeology as well as the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age. As a HASTAC scholar she works to incorporate the use and development of digital tools for humanities scholarship.

Dr. Eric Cline talks Noah’s Ark

In light of the recent release of the movie about Noah starring Russell Crow, Friends of ASOR interviewed Dr. Eric Cline of The George Washington University to talk about Biblical Archaeology and claims to the discovery of Noah’s Ark. Listen to the podcast on the Friends of ASOR Website.

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From Pirates to Pax Romana: The Economic Transformation of Crete

Check out the video of A&P Editor Jayd Lewis presenting her paper, “From Pirates to Pax Romana: The Economic Transformation of Crete,” at the 2014 NCSU History Graduate Student Association Conference on March 22.   From Pirates to Pax Romana: The Economic Transformation of Crete (J. Jayd H. Lewis) from Jayd Lewis1 on Vimeo.

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Update: Volunteer or attend a field school this summer!

  Do you want to be an archaeologist? You can be this summer! There are tons of opportunities to volunteer or even get class credit for participating in a field school on an archaeological project. Check out these neat opportunities and apply today!   Azoria Project 2014 (Field School in Classical Archaeology) If you’re looking to … Continue reading »

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Word of the Day: boustrophedon [Greek: βουστροφηδόν]

One of the most challenging aspects of reading ancient texts is determining in which direction the text runs. As you may know, Egyptian Hieroglyphics could be written from right to left, from left to right, or from top to bottom (the most usual, however, being from right to left). The same is true in the earliest … Continue reading »

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Digital Reconstruction of Shetland Settlement Jarlshof in Scotland

In 1897, a series of severe storms washed away parts of the Scottish coastline on Shetland, exposing the over 4,000 year-old remains of a settlement: Jarlshof. Recently, a team led by Kieran Baxter created a digital reconstruction of the site’s various occupation periods–from its earliest dwelling in 2700 BCE through the Bronze Age and Iron Age. You can see … Continue reading »

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Want to be an archaeologist? Volunteer or attend a field school this summer!

  Do you want to be an archaeologist? You can be this summer! There are tons of opportunities to volunteer or even get class credit for participating in a field school on an archaeological project. Check out these neat opportunities and apply today!   Azoria Project 2014 (Field School in Classical Archaeology) If you’re looking to … Continue reading »

Categories: Archaeology News | 1 Comment

Delphi: bellybutton of the ancient world

Historian and classicist Michael Scott is coming out with a new book in April, entitled DELPHI: A History of the Center of the Ancient World. In anticipation of its publication, I’ve been watching the documentary on Delphi that he made for BBC Four. Check it out below: Also, check out his website and blog: http://michaelscottweb.com/index.php/guilty-pleasures/   

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Fabulous Imperialism! Pinky the Cat teaches us about the 1893 Columbian Exposition

  Pinky the cat hosts a wonderful video highlighting one of the most important (and often forgotten) event in modern American history–the Columbian Exposition of 1893 (also known as the Chicago World’s Fair). Check out the video: “It’s beyond ironic that the most lavish spectacular public event of its era [the Chicago World's Fair] would … Continue reading »

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Update: Bronze Age Palaces of the Eastern Mediterranean

The American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) blog recently featured the “Bronze Age Palaces of the Eastern Mediterranean” poster that I presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting. Check it out on the ASOR blog. Here is the poster I presented at this year’s ASOR (American Schools of Oriental Research) Annual Meeting in Baltimore (original post).  

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Midieval Armenian Ghost City of Ani

The Atlantic‘s “In Focus” section on January 24 showcased the ruined medieval city of Ani, situated on the Akhurian River in modern-day Turkey. Known as “the city of a thousand and one churches,” Ani was founded over 1,600 years ago. Below is a plan of the site as well as a few of the pictures from The Atlantic’s … Continue reading »

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